Request a Demo
Posts by

Selena Jammaz

Home / Blog Archive
Therapy and Support

VR Benefits both Mental & Physical Health

(This post originally appeared on the website of our partner XRHealth and is being reprinted here.)

The way we speak about “being healthy” today sounds slightly different than how it was perceived in the past. Oftentimes, “healthiness” was exclusively associated with fitness, strength, and aesthetics only. What you ate and how much you exercised supposedly determined the entirety of your wellness. However, we know very well that this view of health enunciates only part of the story. Today, the scope has widened, and rightfully so, to include mental health.  

 A change in our collective perception of health isn’t the only paradigm shift that we’re observing this century. Technological innovations have been launching in multiple industries, and the health industry is no exception. The development of virtual reality (VR) tech, paired with a growing emphasis on maintaining a holistically healthy lifestyle, has given rise to a variety of medical VR applications for both mental and physical health. Although still in its infancy, the impacts of VR therapy for patients suffering from a range of health issues looks promising.  

Here are a few physical and mental health conditions that VR is proving beneficial for: 

Physical Health 

  • Stroke  
  • Cerebral Palsy 
  • Parkinson’s disease 
  • Multiple Sclerosis 
  • Loss of upper limb motor functions 

Mental Health 

  • Social Anxiety 
  • Stress 
  • Depression 
  • Isolation 

VR Therapy Impact on Physical Health 

One of the biggest issues that VR helps people overcome is a general lack of physical activity. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), approximately 80% of adolescents around the world are physically inactive due to lifestyle factors. This lack of activity should be no surprise. After a typical 8-hour workday or a long day at school, it’s important that people try to find the time to unwind and move their bodies. VR exercise turns this often dreaded task into engaging simulations that people actually look forward to, such as virtual cycling. The idea began with the development of three-dimensional displays on TVs in which controllers weren’t needed for users who wanted to exercise. VR picked up where this tech left off by jumping from 3D to completely immersive experiences. Studies are now showing the tendency of VR to increase the likelihood of long-term adherence to exercise. 

For those who are seeking to mitigate the effects of disease or recover from physical bodily harm, VR technology has begun to prove effective. Children with cerebral palsy, as well as patients suffering from strokes and Parkinson’s disease are attaining significant improvement on their balance abilities with the use of VR. A recent study suggests that stroke patients may also regain motor functions through VR therapy, “…researchers suggested that VR could promote the lower limb function of patients who suffered from stroke.”  

VR is working to improve upper limb mobility by showing patients avatars of their upper limbs, then having them visualize their attempted movements to perform a task. For example, VR can simulate a sword in a patient’s hand, then tell them to slice through line targets on a screen, making the experience more fun and a source of motivation. Over time, the patients develop improvements to their motor-imagery, enhancing their ability to plan movements and lead to a steady recovery of upper limb motor functions.  

From a physical therapist’s point of view, the use of VR to streamline the processes of gauging feedback and upholding patient accountability is a plus. Through the analytical data gathered from therapy sessions, therapists can track whether patients are showing improvements. Accordingly, they may have the patients progress to more difficult exercises and ultimately normal physical activity. They can also monitor if patients are performing their programs at home, as opposed to assigning pamphlets and pictures to the patients in hopes that they’ll practice them on their own. 

VR Therapy Impact on Mental Health 

Looking to balance its capability of helping patients on the other side of the health spectrum, VR is making its mark on mental health.  

Anxiety is a mental health issue plaguing a significant portion of the human population, especially in the United States. Most observable in teens, a deepening pressure to succeed and live a certain lifestyle because of comparison to others on social media is a major anxiety driver. Constantly feeling like you’ll embarrass yourself in front of others, a pressing unease in crowded settings or any hindrance to perform day to day tasks as a result of  social pressure are all symptoms of anxiety. Prior to the emergence of VRET, the VR version of exposure therapy whereby individuals are required to confront the source of their anxiety, patients would visit therapists and describe their emotional troubles in the past tense. 

 With the use of VR, therapists can engage patients in real-time simulations that emulate the fears they speak about, and adjust for intensity in the process. The value here is that the therapist and the patient can both be present in the fear-inducing situation at the same time, allowing for immediate and effective confrontation and discussion of how to overcome that fear. Additionally, VRET is often more acceptable to patients than imaginal or in vivo (having the patient directly experience the anxiety provoking stimuli) exposure therapy.  

New research supports VR’s ability to overcome stress and reduce depression in patients. Currently, virtual reality therapy is showing potential to promote distress management, mood enhancement and stress relief. Because depression patients often lack the motivation to step outside their familiar home environments, virtual reality recreates any setting imaginable for the user. For example, patients can dive into coral reefs, watch a sports game, or take a pleasant stroll through the forest to the music of a soft piano melody from wherever they’re located.  

A study aimed to uncover the effects of virtual reality on mental wellness, reports an overall positive impact of using VR to treat patients. The use of the technology yielded lower stress levels as a result of lower heart rate and higher skin temperature. Patients also reported higher levels of relaxation. Because the study tested patients using a variety of immersive technologies, future studies looking at which specific aspects of VR benefits patients are yet to be done. Regardless, VR is currently being used and monitored for patient feedback.  

Shifting the focus to our youth, VR tech can also aid students who display problems in the classroom due to being plagued with anxiety when having to perform tasks in front of peers. Other students who are stressed due to highly competitive education systems may also benefit from the use of VR to reduce stress. Additionally, student athletes who need support to mentally unwind and prepare for games may also turn to VR as a collaborative platform to connect with sport psychologists. 

VR Therapy and What’s Next 

 After getting to know VR’s multifaceted personality in greater depth, it’s apparent that its potential to help patients improve their health abounds. In recognition of its versatility, virtual reality company Foretell Reality is widening its scope beyond using VR for immersive therapy sessions only. Together with XRHealth, Foretell is working to merge VR tech with physical therapy to reap the best outcomes for patients in need.  

The goal is clear: to effectively improve the mental and physical health of as many patients as possible. Today, the means to achieve this goal is with virtual reality.

Therapy and Support

VR Exposure Therapy for Eating Disorders

Influencers. Thought leaders. Foodies. Models. Instagram. Sound familiar? It’s 2020, and it’s noisy. The struggle between people and eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia, dates back centuries ago. The human need to be viewed as aesthetically pleasing and acceptable in the eyes of others has intensified in recent years, in parallel with the raging popularity of social media. No, social media isn’t the scapegoat for all of our problems. It does provide us with a place for sharing and receiving information, keeping up with market trends and providing entertaining content after a strenuous day at work.

However, we can’t forget that it’s called social-media. As in, the places we share our media with the rest of the world. Comparing ourselves to others has never been easier, has never been quicker, and has never been a stronger driver behind body self-consciousness. People with eating disorders possess a negative body image of themselves, where what they see is shaped by negative attitudes and perceptions of how they think they look. As a consequence of the distorted lens they can’t but peer through, they tend to overestimate their body weight and shape, and live in a cloud of depression, anxiety and shame as a result.

Rather than turning to drug therapy, a form of psychotherapeutic treatment called Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is commonly used to aid in reducing the automatic, negative mental responses people with eating disorders internally struggle with. However, it is limited. Discussing how you feel with your therapist when you’re not actively immersed in that headspace isn’t as effective as sharing your feelings right as they come. But how can that be made possible? With simulated environments.

Virtual Reality (VR) technology is increasingly being used to assist in many mental health conditions that involve managing complex emotions. A study on the use of virtual reality to help individuals with eating disorders outlines that, “Body image disorder in patients with eating disorders are related to a deficiency in their ability to update their negative body image stored in their memory…with sensory motor and proprioceptive inputs in real time.”

By virtually reproducing situations that trigger destructive emotions to flood patients’ minds, therapists are able to step in at that very moment and help them become aware of their body image distortions. This method of creating realistic anxiety inducing simulations, or exposure therapy, is made especially effective with the use of VR tech, and has been developed by numerous companies such as Foretell Reality to help patients in need

The virtual environments are supervised, allowing the therapist to adjust the simulation for the stress level. The patients create their virtual “body”, or the avatar, that reflects how they perceive themselves. The therapist can then generate a silhouette based on the patient’s real body dimensions in order to make apparent the difference between perception and reality to the patient.

Potential for creating all sorts of emotion provoking environments unique to each patient- either who suffer from the mental effects of eating disorders or other mental illnesses- is large with Virtual Reality. Re-living the very environments that arouse negative emotions on the spot allows therapists to help their patients confront their issues right on the spot, and therefore handle them more effectively.

Foretell Reality is an enterprise VR solution for interpersonal communication and business collaboration. Learn more here.

Lifestyle, Tech, Therapy and Support

The Mental Health Puzzle

Mental health. What it means today in 2020 is largely different than how a vast number of people perceived it nearly a decade ago. The stigma of its importance is often perceived as being secondary to its tangible counterpart, physical health. Thankfully, more people are recognizing the relationship between mental health and physical wellbeing—especially due to the aid of awareness campaigns, such as Bell Let’s Talk, and increased advocacy from public figures. But what happens when an unprecedented pandemic forces millions to stay at home just as the world has started opening up to the idea of seeking real help?

Although digital alternatives such as videoconferencing, phone calls and email have shown to be effective in helping a scope of mental health illnesses, a piece remains missing. An essential element that links one human to another in order to cultivate an environment of trust and ease of mind is feeling the presence of another human.

When living in isolation and a constant state of uncertainty, there is value in having communication that fosters a sense of connection. Out of all telehealth platforms, Virtual Reality (VR) is the first form of communication that reaps the same advantages as face-to-face meetings and offers additional benefits that would be impossible to execute in a shared, physical environment. Thankfully, technology has been advancing prior to the outbreak of COVID-19, and VR is now surfacing in our new age of remote-health needs.

Companies such as Foretell Reality specialize in creating immersive platforms designed to foster nearly real interpersonal human experiences. A patient’s comfort doesn’t need to be compromised when taking part in VR therapeutic sessions. One VR experience with partner company XRHealth is purposed around ensuring a comfortable environment for its patients by providing relaxing décor and customizable avatars.

Receiving mental and emotional support isn’t a one time thing. Yes, doctor-patient follow ups are possible over the phone and through video call, but VR brings its people closer to each other. That feeling of going into the office and trusting that your doctor has been monitoring your progression is made possible with VR because it minimizes the robotic element that comes with using technology. A recent article from HealthTech outlines, “…In the arena of pain management or mental health, immersion in virtual worlds can produce better results.”

The human species is an incredibly social one, relying heavily on the subtle nuances of eye contact, hand gestures and posture to communicate. COVID-19 has disrupted this mode of communication by forcing a lifestyle of isolation- an especially harmful phenomena to mental health patients in need of real human help. Thankfully, virtual reality is working hand in hand with the healthcare industry to connect patients with doctors in immersive environments that stretch far beyond what video and chat are able to offer.

Foretell Reality is an enterprise VR solution for interpersonal communication and business collaboration. Learn more here.

Therapy and Support

Behavioral Assessment in VR

We are starting to see more studies about the efficacy of #VirtualReality (#VR) for mental health assessment. The ability to analyze behavioral data in a variety of scenarios distinguishes VR from other digital #telehealth technologies.

#ForetellReality analytics provide behavioral data tied to social engagement including time spent speaking, direction of gaze, and who is talking to and/or over other participants. We do not store this or any other personal data to ensure HIPPA compliance, but we do make they analytics available to our moderators, clinicians, and therapists to help them personalize and improve outcomes.

Here is what one large-scale study from last month concluded about VR assessment for #mentalheath :

“Automatic data capture of behaviors and signals from VR experiences can reveal important insights that might improve our understanding of mental health conditions and inform more tailored treatments.”

Read more here:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7366939/

Foretell Reality is an enterprise VR solution for interpersonal communication and business collaboration. Learn more here.

Therapy and Support

‘Zoom Fatigue’, Teletherapy, and VR

A recent survey from the American Psychological Association finds that 76% of clinicians are conducting all of their sessions through teletherapy while only 16% are doing a combination of remote and in-person sessions.

While telehealth provides great benefits like convenience and flexibility and can embolden patients to open up even more than they might in person, there are drawbacks. With many people constantly on video calls for school and work, a phenomenon known as ‘Zoom fatigue’ can result in patients not feeling fully present in a conversation and that can require therapists to be extra vigilant in driving conversations.

Virtual Reality (VR) can combat ‘Zoom fatigue’ by offering a much more immersive experience. This is particularly effective for group therapy and support. Unlike telehealth visits through a phone or laptop, VR provides an immersive, distraction-free experience in which remote support group attendees and therapy clients interact with one another through personalized, expressive avatars in shared, 3D environments.

Embodying a virtual identity provides anonymity, if desired, and eliminates fears of being judged by appearance while still allowing for human-like gestures, directional gazing, manipulation of objects, and movement within space.

Group conversation flows more freely in VR allowing therapists to observe both verbal and non verbal cues in ways they cannot through a webcam. VR allows for interactions between people like handing someone a virtual tissue or a providing a comforting touch on the shoulder.

While applications like Zoom work well for certain kinds of communication, therapeutic interactions benefit from the authenticity and realism found in VR.

Foretell Reality is an enterprise VR solution for interpersonal communication and business collaboration. Learn more here.

Therapy and Support

VR To Combat Stress and Anxiety

A nice summary in Forbes of how various companies are offering Virtual Reality (VR) treatments to help people cope with anxiety and stress during these challenging times. Among them is our partner XRHealth.

While the individual VR treatments highlighted in the article can certainly help alleviate stress and anxiety, they do not address the feeling of isolation that often accompanies these feelings.

That is why XRHealth chose Foretell Reality to also provide safe, therapeutic environments where remote participants can meet to share their experiences as part of a moderated support group.

Free from distraction, participants embody life-like avatars that combine authentic human gestures and expressions with the sense of being in the physical presence of others.

At Foretell Reality, we believe that individual VR treatment combined with group support and therapy is a truly holistic approach to tackling a variety of mental health challenges, particularly with so many people now struggling and in isolation.

Foretell Reality is an enterprise VR solution for interpersonal communication and business collaboration. Learn more here.

Uncategorized

Limitless: Live Events in VR

In 2019, live events ranging from conferences to concerts to sporting events generated tens of billions of dollars in ticket revenue. With recent losses exceeding 90%, the live events industry must answer two critical questions. How do you put on a live event without any attendees and how do you generate revenue without ticket sales?

In the tech industry, where direct losses exceed $1 billion alone, live conferences provide a forum for learning, networking, promotion, and collaboration but that is all predicated on everyone being in the same physical space at the same time. So how can event holders recreate the feeling and function of being at a live event safely and without the need to travel?

Virtual Reality (VR) offers the closest experience to being in person of any technology or medium. Many organizations have been embracing VR for live entertainment for years. The NBA streamed it’s first live game in VR back in 2015 and Oculus Venues streamed its first live concert back in 2018. More recent examples include the largest VR music and arts festival, Lost Horizon, which is set to take place this summer with over 50 performers and 4 stages.

Though the entertainment industry may have been the first group to embrace VR for live events, recent circumstances have forced all live event promoters to strongly consider VR in lieu of in person gatherings. HTC and the IEEE both held VR-only conferences this year and while technology companies may currently be leading this trend, other industries are soon to follow as the pandemic continues and travel budgets are cut.

While the move toward conferences and other live events in VR is positive for the health of attendees, the environment, and the organizers bottom line, it also presents a unique opportunity to revisit the live event experience from the ground up.

While VR can replicate being in familiar venues such as arenas, presentation halls, or trade floors, it can also bring attendees into fantastical environments to participate in new types of interactions and experiences not possible in the real world. We don’t need stadiums or conference centers to hold a virtual audience. We are in new uncharted territory with limitless possibilities. Performers and speakers can be on top of clouds, in the International Space Station, or appear larger than life in front of 12 million fans. Presenters can take an audience on a curated, immersive journey of their product or service and those in attendance can take on any form or appearance.

As evidence of the move toward VR for live events, tech giant Apple recently purchased NextVR, a platform known for producing immersive experiences in sports, music, and entertainment. Apple hopes to incorporate the platform into its music streaming subscription service and its growing video streaming platform, offering subscribers the option to attend concerts or live events virtually. Forget the streaming wars that seem to be all the focus lately, the new frontier is VR for live events.

Uncategorized

Foretell Reality for Therapy and Support

Barriers to In-Person Care

Support groups as well as individual and group therapy can help improve mood and emotional well being. The conversation between a therapist and a patient, or between patients, allows a forum to explore and communicate feelings and experiences openly, get perspective on one’s situation, and receive advice and support.

Unfortunately, barriers exist for those seeking in-person mental and emotional help. To begin with, finding and committing to a therapist or group can be a daunting task. It is time consuming to travel around ‘trying out’ different alternatives. Moreover, exposing oneself to others, especially when distressed, can also be anxiety producing due to the fear of others’ judgment. It takes time, trial and error to find the right forum and therapy methods. Let alone, get used to new ways of sharing one’s deepest emotions and concerns.

When a good fit is found, regular travel to an office or meeting room can be equally time consuming, expensive, and challenging, particularly for those with social anxieties or physical impairments. This is especially true in rural areas where access to trained counselors and support groups is limited.

The current pandemic highlights another challenge to seeking mental support, the fear of contracting an illness when in a social setting. For many this is a new fear, but for others it existed prior to COVID-19. For example, cancer patients risk their health every time they return to the hospital or another shared space for a support group session as do many others with a range of ailments that compromise their immune systems.

It appears that though in-person therapy and support can offer substantial mental benefits through greater connection, direction and engagement, it is simply not possible or preferable for many people seeking help.

Rise Of Telemental Health

Not surprising, there has been a huge increase in the adoption of virtual therapy administered through mobile applications and websites. Telemental health visits are on pace to top 80 million by 2021 in the United States, up from 50 million in 2019.

And it appears that remote therapy works successfully for many people. A study by the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health has found telehealth to facilitate positive health outcomes on par with, and in some cases exceeding, in person sessions. “Telehealth services resulted in lowered depression, better overall mental health, increased satisfaction with mental health care and coping skills, and increased confidence in handling depression,” the study concludes.

While the ability to seek help remotely is a positive advancement, the technology to facilitate both individual and group sessions lacks the level of immersiveness, engagement, and focus of an in-person experience.

Video, chat, or audio communication cannot replicate the feeling of two or more people being in a shared place at the same time. This is particularly important for group therapy and support where the natural flow of conversation is fundamental to treatment. Video calls and audio bridges simply cannot recreate the dynamics of a group conversation and can instead lead to stilted and disjointed interactions or, worse still, misunderstandings and misinterpretations.

Body language, social cues, gestures, and gaze are all limited or impossible on flat screens while anonymity comes at the expense of full participation and equal standing with other participants.

Moreover, sessions held over phones or computers are prone to distraction from outside sources, uneven audio or video quality, and self-consciousness over physical appearance on screen.

While the move toward virtual therapy and support is a positive one, opening access and opportunity for those who need it, the technology underlying the treatment experience needs to evolve into something much more immersive.

Virtual Reality (VR): The Evolution of Remote Communication

“We’ve shifted from the Industrial Age to the Information Age, and now we’re transitioning to the Experience Age.” says Tico Ballagas, senior manager, AI and Emerging Compute Lab, HP Labs. “VR has this ability to conjure experiences at any moment for anybody, and that creates a new way that we as a human race can interact.”

Foretell Reality, a VR platform for therapy and support, addresses the shortcomings of video, chat, and audio, by immersing participants and therapists into shared, 3D environments.

Through a fully customizable and anonymized avatar, a patient feels safe to share their feelings without the concern of judgement due to her or his appearance. Patients and therapists can gesture in any direction, direct his or her gaze around a room, pick up on others social cues, and even move around within the space or interact with and share objects.

Most importantly, everyone in the environment sees and hears the same thing but from his or her own perspective, just as if they were in the same room. This creates a feeling of presence and of having a shared experience with others versus a video call where everyone is in a different physical location.

Using a VR headset, sessions are much less prone to distraction from outside sources or from messages flashing across a phone or laptop screen. Also, there is no need to be self-conscious about appearance as identity is shielded behind a customizable virtual avatar. This is important as remaining anonymous, helps lower levels of anxiety and depression present in patients and leads to more open and meaningful discussions between participants and therapists.

VR even extends what is possible in the real world by allowing for immersion into any setting and in any form with anyone in the world. Whether that setting promotes group mindfulness or replicates potentially painful past experiences, these events can be shared with a professional or with a group for real therapeutic outcomes.

VR Support Groups: Yale School of Medicine and XRHealth

Foretell Reality has partnered with Yale School of Medicine to develop effective and convenient solutions for adolescent cancer patients to participate in group therapy without having to travel to and from the hospital. Travel is not only inconvenient and expensive, it can lead to a risk of infection and can be physically and emotionally taxing on the patient.

Participants range from aged 13 to 30 years and all are either actively in treatment or had received treatment within the last year. The groups, comprised mainly of young adults, are given measurements to gauge levels of anxiety, depression, and resilience in order to see how VR group sessions compare to more conventional methods of group therapy.

Initial findings are promising and indicate that group therapy in VR can reduce anxiety and depression in ways other platforms cannot. Dr. Asher Marks, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology) and Director of Pediatric Neuro-Oncology, who is leading the initiative, states that “the VR technology offered by Foretell Reality allows users to jointly partake as avatars in a shared experience which cannot be replicated over conference call or video chat.”

XRHealth, a VR telehealth company, is also leveraging Foretell Reality to power support groups for patients who are being treated for similar conditions. Patients are first evaluated by a clinician and then sent a VR headset pre-loaded with a personalized treatment program. Once in treatment, a patient can then attend scheduled support group sessions with other participants who share similar ailments.

Foretell Reality for VR Therapy and Support

Foretell Reality is a secure and customizable solution that offers immersive, engaging, and distraction-free virtual telemental health sessions for both groups and individuals.

Our application runs on a variety of affordable headsets including Oculus Quest, Pico, and HTC Focus Plus and our solution can be integrated into existing telehealth platforms in order to extend treatment into VR.

The demand for virtual mental health care is growing rapidly and technology to improve the experience needs to follow. Foretell Reality makes remote feel near for those seeking help and support in a way that video, audio, and chat cannot.

Interested in learning more about Foretell Reality? Contact us or schedule a demo.

Misc

Rethinking the Virtual Job Fair

In times of economic uncertainty and large scale unemployment, job fairs provide an opportunity for large numbers of job seekers to identify employers who are hiring in one convenient location. Given recent circumstances, we are now seeing a rise in virtual job fairs, aiming to connect job seekers with prospective employers purely online. Virtual job fairs can take different forms ranging from a simple list of employers websites to live video presentations to scheduled one on one sessions.

While virtual job fairs serve a necessary purpose, they lack the hustle and bustle of an in-person event in which employers and job seekers can meet face-to-face for interviews, informative sessions, and assessments. Casual networking is particularly challenging given the limitations of current online tools like video and chat. Not surprisingly, attendees often describe the virtual job fair experience as frustrating and disjointed.

Virtual Reality (VR) presents an opportunity not only to improve the virtual job fair experience but also to redesign it from the ground up. Why meet in a conference hall behind a booth or table when employers can showcase a fully immersive version of their office as a way to highlight their company’s culture? Why just share a job description when you can have prospective employees engage with a simulation of the actual job? Why attempt to network across a video screen when VR provides an experience where dozens of people can connect with one another in an open, 3D environment? VR opens the door for creativity when it comes to recruitment and also provides job seekers unexpected benefits like anonymity if desired.

As with other applications, VR provides the closest experience to meeting in person of any technology available. Personalized avatars allow for subtle, nonverbal communication like gestures, directional gazing, and movements within 3D space. These types of interactions in a distraction-free, focused environment allow applicants and employers to conduct meaningful interviews and informative sessions in a way that closest replicates a real job fair.

Like other live events, VR presents an opportunity to explore new paradigms for remote events where the technology can not only replicate but push beyond the experience as it is today.

Live events

Rethinking the Virtual Job Fair

In times of economic uncertainty and large scale unemployment, job fairs provide an opportunity for large numbers of job seekers to identify employers who are hiring in one convenient location. Given recent circumstances, we are now seeing a rise in virtual job fairs, aiming to connect job seekers with prospective employers purely online. Virtual job fairs can take different forms ranging from a simple list of employers websites to live video presentations to scheduled one on one sessions.

While virtual job fairs serve a necessary purpose, they lack the hustle and bustle of an in-person event in which employers and job seekers can meet face-to-face for interviews, informative sessions, and assessments. Casual networking is particularly challenging given the limitations of current online tools like video and chat. Not surprisingly, attendees often describe the virtual job fair experience as frustrating and disjointed.

Virtual Reality (VR) presents an opportunity not only to improve the virtual job fair experience but also to redesign it from the ground up. Why meet in a conference hall behind a booth or table when employers can showcase a fully immersive version of their office as a way to highlight their company’s culture? Why just share a job description when you can have prospective employees engage with a simulation of the actual job? Why attempt to network across a video screen when VR provides an experience where dozens of people can connect with one another in an open, 3D environment? VR opens the door for creativity when it comes to recruitment and also provides job seekers unexpected benefits like anonymity if desired.

As with other applications, VR provides the closest experience to meeting in person of any technology available. Personalized avatars allow for subtle, nonverbal communication like gestures, directional gazing, and movements within 3D space. These types of interactions in a distraction-free, focused environment allow applicants and employers to conduct meaningful interviews and informative sessions in a way that closest replicates a real job fair.

Like other live events, VR presents an opportunity to explore new paradigms for remote events where the technology can not only replicate but push beyond the experience as it is today.

1 2 3 4
About Exponent

Exponent is a modern business theme, that lets you build stunning high performance websites using a fully visual interface. Start with any of the demos below or build one on your own.

Get Started
Subscribe Now
Privacy Settings
We use cookies to enhance your experience while using our website. If you are using our Services via a browser you can restrict, block or remove cookies through your web browser settings. We also use content and scripts from third parties that may use tracking technologies. You can selectively provide your consent below to allow such third party embeds. For complete information about the cookies we use, data we collect and how we process them, please check our Privacy Policy
Youtube
Consent to display content from Youtube
Vimeo
Consent to display content from Vimeo
Google Maps
Consent to display content from Google
Spotify
Consent to display content from Spotify
Sound Cloud
Consent to display content from Sound
Contact Us